Colours for Registration

The Havanese coat comes in a myriad of colours and shadings.    The colour choices from the CKC registration form are explained below. Only one selection may be made.

Note* These colour choices for CKC registration are current as of January 2010.  Click on the colour swatches for additional information and to see sample photos of Havanese in the different colours. 

Colour block

BLACK (CKC#10) - The colour black is the deepest darkest colour. Solid colour black dog. Puppies that appear soft black or that have subtle hues or undertones of colour throughout may go through some changes in colour over time as they mature. These puppies will still be registered as black as that is their apparent dominant colour at the time of registration.  The eyerims, lips and nose are black.

BLACK & SILVER (CKC#27) - Black dog with the traditional "point" pattern where the points are in the silver shades (similar to the markings on a black/silver Schnauzer). Points are lighter markings that appear on the eyebrows, cheeks, inside the ears, chest, feet and vent. The points of a Black and Silver Havanese can be any shade of solid or brindled silver or pewter.  The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
BLACK & TAN (CKC#29) - Black dog with the traditional "point" pattern where the points are in golden shades. Points are lighter markings that appear on the eyebrows, cheeks, inside the ears, chest, feet and vent (similar to the markings on a Rottweiler or Doberman). The points of a Black & Tan Havanese can be any shade of solid or brindled cream, tan, gold, or red. The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
BLACK & WHITE (CKC#31) - Two colour coat.  Both Black and White are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented.  It could be a black dog with white feet and blaze, or white trim; one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular black patches.   "Black & White" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out. The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
BRINDLE (CKC#105) - Pattern of dark specks and/or streaks on a lighter base coat.  Streaks or stripes can be soft and indistinct or sharp and well defined. A dark face mask may be present. Mask may range in intensity and extent from a simple darkened muzzle to a raccoon-type mask around the eyes or extend to include the entire face and the ears. Some masked brindles also have a dark dorsal stripe, dark tail and dark paws. The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
BRINDLE & WHITE (CKC#110) - Both Brindle and White are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented. It could be a brindle dog with white feet and blaze, or white trim; one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular brindle patches.   "Brindle & White" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out. A dark face mask may be present. Mask may range in intensity and extent from a simple darkened muzzle to a raccoon-type mask around the eyes or extend to include the entire face and the ears. Some brindles also have a dark dorsal stripe, dark tail and dark paws. The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
CHAMPAGNE (CKC#131) -  Varying shades from off-white through cream, blond, buff and beige.  Dog is completely champagne; however, there may be variations in shading throughout the coat.  It is not unusual to have slightly darker shadings on the dorsal or upper parts of the dog (head, ears, neck and back) and lighter shadings on the ventral or lower parts of the dog (chest, belly and legs).The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
CHAMPAGNE & WHITE (CKC#718) - Two colour coat. Both Champagne and White are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented. It could be a champagne dog with white feet and blaze or white trim; one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular champagne patches.   "Champagne & White" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out.The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
CHOCOLATE (CKC#133) - A chocolate dog will be solid chocolate brown. Chocolate can be varying shades of brown reminiscent of confectionery, ranging from the lighter brown of milk chocolate to the medium brown of semi-sweet to the deeper brown of dark baker's chocolate. Chocolate dogs have self-coloured pigment in liver/brown instead of black for eyerims, lips and nose. There is no black on a chocolate dog at all.
CHOCOLATE & WHITE (CKC#539) - Two colour coat. Both Chocolate and White are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented. It could be a chocolate dog with white feet and blaze, or white trim, one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular chocolate patches.   "Chocolate & White" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out.
GOLD (CKC#202) - Golden colour from honey and pale apricot to sandy gold and toffee. Dog is completely gold; however, there may be variations in shadings throughout the coat. It is not unusual to have slightly darker shadings on the dorsal or upper parts of the dog (head, neck and back) and lighter shadings on the ventral or lower parts of the dog (chest, belly and legs).The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
GOLD & WHITE (CKC#204) - Two colour coat. Both Gold and White are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented. It could be a gold dog with white feet and blaze, or white trim; one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular gold patches.   "Gold & white" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out.The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
RED (CKC#314) - Rich warm colour. From orangey pumpkin to chestnut to deep mahogany. Dog is completely red; however, coat may have blended shadings of colour. It is not unusual to have slightly darker shading on the dorsal or upper parts of the dog (head, neck and back) and lighter shadings on the ventral or lower parts of the dog (chest, belly and legs).The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
RED & WHITE (CKC#322) - Two colour coat. Both Red and White are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented. It could be a red dog with white feet and blaze, or white trim; one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular red patches.   "Red & white" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out.The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
SABLE (CKC#351) - Variegated coat with a lighter background coat and dark tipping at the ends of the hair.  Coat colour is very changeable. The colour may soften almost to the base color as years go by. Dark tipping if cut off may not return. A sable will generally retain some dark hairs in the ears, tail or along the spine.  A dark face mask may be present. Mask may range in intensity and extent from a simple darkened muzzle to a raccoon-type mask around the eyes to a full dark face extending into the ears. Some sables also have a dark dorsal stripe, dark tail and dark paws.The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
SABLE & WHITE (CKC#354) - Both Sable areas and White areas are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented. It could be a sable dog with white feet and blaze, or white trim; one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular sable patches.   "Sable & white" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out. A dark face mask may be present. Mask may range in intensity and extent from a simple darkened muzzle to a raccoon-type mask around the eyes to a full dark face extending into the ears. Some sables also have a dark dorsal stripe, dark tail and dark paws.The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
SILVER (CKC#376) - The coat appears black at birth. The colour lightens to varying shades of platinum, silver, pewter or charcoal as the dog matures. Final colour may display blended shadings of silver. Where the colour change begins shortly after birth and is very obvious by 6-8 weeks of age, puppies may be registered as silver.  For others where there is no noticeable early change, the puppies will be registered as black as that is the dominant colour at the time of registration. The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
SILVER & WHITE (CKC#383) - Both Silver areas and White areas are significantly present in the coat; either one may be the predominant colour or they may be equally represented. It could be a silver dog with white feet and blaze, or white trim; one with classic Irish pied markings or a predominantly white dog with irregular silver patches.   "Silver & white" identifies the colours present in the coat but does not specify the pattern in which these colours are laid out. The eyerims, lips and nose are black.
TRICOLOUR (CKC#429) - Three coloured dog. Generally Black/Tan/White, but may also be Black/Silver/White, Sable/Tan/White etc.  A Tricolour may be any colour dog with any degree of white sporting a third colour as a tan/silver point pattern or may be a predominantly white dog with irregular patches in two different colours. The eyerims, lips and nose are black.

WHITE  (CKC#438) - A true white Havanese has no colour or shadings anywhere. It is white all over. The eyerims, lips and nose are black. A dog that appears white but has darker ears is not true white, it is likelier either a light champagne or a champagne & white. 

PARTICOLOUR (CKC#304) - The term "Particolour" has two different meanings. First it is the broad and general term for any Havanese which has a coat of one or more colour(s) plus any degree of white. Secondly, the name is sometimes used to designate a more specific pattern of colour/white where a dog is more than 50% white with irregular patches of one or more colours.  Particolour is a pattern rather than a colour. This identifies that the dog has defined areas of colour as well white on the coat, but does not identify the colour(s) or further specify the extent of white.

Where a Havanese puppy does not fall into one of the colour choices listed on the registration form, a breeder may choose to identify the colour/pattern as “other” and then define it. CKC may then register according to your description or they may change it to the closest identification they allow.  On-line registrations do not have this option and only allow the choices above. Registration colours are based on the dominant colour(s) at time of registration.

How would you register the puppies in this litter?

From left to right  1-Sable, 2-Sable&White, 3-Black, 4-Sable&White, 5-Black&White, 6-Sable

For additonal information about colours and registration, see our colour FAQ page.  

Thank you all the owners and breeders who have helped make the colour pages come alive. Your help is sincerely appreciated.

  

Authored by: 
Education Committee